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read epub à A Tale of Two Cities è Paperback ☆ ✵ [BOOKS] ⚦ A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens ✿ – Helpyouantib.co.uk After eighteen years as a political prisoner in the Bastille the ageing Doctor Manette is finally released and reunited with his daughter in England There the lives of two very Of London they are drawn against their will to the vengeful bloodstained streets of Paris at the height of the Reign of Terror and they soon fall under the lethal shadow of La Guillotine Most satisfying ending in the English language Yes the last line is a classic It is a far far better thing concluding in astonishingly concise language for Dickens the peace and redemption of the story's most poignant romantic hero But this novel delivers such a gratifying experience because there are in fact many characters who cover significant emotional ground in their journey to love one woman as best they can Lucie's father battles his way back from madness under the gentle protection of his daughter Lucie's childhood nursemaid evolves from a comical stereotype to an embattled force to be reckoned with Lucie's husband's well meaning if bland noblesse oblige culminates in not his hoped for heroic moment but a moment of uiet dignity that is most moving for its humility Even Lucie's banker reaches dizzying heights of heroic accomplishment when Dickens appoints the uiet businessman the vehicle for an entire family's escape from the guillotineIt is true that Lucie herself engages the reader less than her brutal counterpart the broken but terrifying Madame Defarge is able to as modern readers are less moved by the swooning heroines who populate the period's literature of sensibility But we can certainly respond to Dickens' powerful and vivid claim love is not only what makes us human it is what allows us to be at times superhumanAnd when Sydney Carton in eual parts love and despair tells Lucie that there is a man who would give his life to keep a life you love beside you ? I go to pieces Every damn time

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Men Charles Darnay an exiled French aristocrat and Sydney Carton a disreputable but brilliant English lawyer become enmeshed through their love for Lucie Manette From the tranuil roads Charles Dickens is a demanding writer The narratives of Great Expectations and Oliver Twist are relaxed and simple when compared to this Reading Dickens reuires concentration and a will to carry on when sometimes the writing gives you a headache This is a historical novel Dickens tells the story of the storming of the Bastille some fifty years after it happened Unlike most of his work all traces of humour are removed There are no caricatures and uirkiness within his writing This is all very serious material which of course it needs to be But for me this is what Dickens does best His ability to juxtapose themes of human suffering poverty and deprivation with ideas of the grotesue ridiculous and at times the plain mad are where his real master strokes of penmanship come throughThat’s what I like the most about Dickens so I knew my enjoyment of this very serious novel would be hindered immediately What we do have though is a strong revenge plot running through the book and the revolt which occurred two thirds of the way in And like the name of the book suggests this is a tale about two cities London and Paris Dickens loved to criticise society and all its stupid aristocratic nuances Here he takes great pains to show that London is no symbol of societal perfection The aftermath of the French revolution placed the British on a pedestal at least to their own minds They could not believe that their own current systems of ruling could cause such a travesty within their own capital Dickens shows that the men in power were just as corrupt and corruptible wherever they sit revolution can happen again “I see a beautiful city and a brilliant people rising from this abyss I see the lives for which I lay down my life peaceful useful prosperous and happy I see that I hold a sanctuary in their hearts and in the hearts of their descendants generations hence It is a far far better thing that I do than I have ever done; it is a far far better rest that I go to than I have ever known”The streets of Paris are seen before and after the bloodshed and all the strands of seemingly unrelated plots are artfully perhaps slightly forcefully? woven together Dickens brings the lives of a huge cast of characters spanning over two cities and two nations all of which have a varied station in life and political beliefs into one final conclusion And it’s a strong conclusion though heavily reliant of coincident This is nothing unusual for fiction of the Victorian era though it did feel very much like a construct The modernists would address such issues in the next century mainly to criticise them heavily due to their incapability at capturing the essence of life within fiction Perhaps they have a point here? So this is a very strong story one that is highly perceptive and intuitive at times As a reader I need a certain degree of entertainment when reading I find that the wonderfully comic elements that are in some of Dickens’ other books help to break up the intense moments of the plot Even Jane Austen would interpose her narrative with moments of scathing sarcasm and wit For me this is far from the finest work of Dickens despite the fact that it seems to be his most popular

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A Tale of Two CitiesAfter eighteen years as a political prisoner in the Bastille the ageing Doctor Manette is finally released and reunited with his daughter in England There the lives of two very different Hundreds thousands of stories long to have a uotable verse just one Tale of Two Cities Dickens masterpiece as far as I'm concerned is bookended by two of the most recognizable uotes in all of English language This is also the darkest story I have read of his and no doubt it's about the bloody French Revolution and Dickens spares none of his acerbic wit to demonize what was rightly demonic Yet to his credit and genius neither does he sugar coat the great social injustices that led irresolutely to the collapse of the aristocratic French class Lacking his usual humor again understandable this nonetheless again displays his mastery of characterization No character is as complete and now archetypal as Madame Defarge I thought that Bill Sykes was his greatest villain but Citizeness Defarge was simply a portrait of evil So many stories hope for a memorable scene and this has many highly influential since I thought of several works that had borrowed heavily from TOTC themes especially Doctor Zhivago many allusions to TOTC and that also made me wonder was TOTC the first dystopian novel? The scene between Madame Defarge and Ms Pross was stunning and made me think of the riveting scene between Porfiry and Raskolnikov in Dostoyevsky's Crime and Punishment Brilliant